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Which is kind of a clue that the Swiss watch industry ultimately touted the supposed superiority of the sweep second hand as a way of fending off the onslaught of quartz movements when they presented a challenge to the status quo. IOW, we've been conditioned by successful marketing to believe sweep seconds are better, and for that matter mechanical movements in general too.
I don't believe sweep seconds are better nor have I been "successfully conditioned" to believe so, I just prefer the way it looks. Time never stops, and a ticking seconds hand only moves for a fraction of a millisecond, remaining still the vast majority of that same seconds it ticks. That to me is a fundamental flaw with the way it tells time, not to mention if it is supposed to highlight accuracy and time readability, then hitting the marks perfectly right is an absolute necessity.

But then again, I don't even need a seconds hand. My anordain hasn't got one and I live very well without it. I don't live my life to such precision.
 

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The answer to the power draw issue is easy. Throw in a smartwatch battery, and use induction charging. should have no problems lasting a month or two between charges.

The problem is demand. The accutron is interesting, but I think that the capacitor implementation is a huge issue. I'd much rather have a rechargeable battery that allows constant operation of the watch, as opposed to a capacitor that needs a factory trip if it drains fully.
 

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Now that I know I prefer no-date watches I'd like to see more watches with no second hand at all. I may not be ready for a one-hander yet but would be just as happy keeping time to the minute instead of second.
 

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There isn't even an issue to begin with, the seiko VH31 battery lasts 2 years. That's perfectly standard.
I meant power draw from super high beat rate quartz. A smartwatch LiPo has ~5-10x the capacity of a coin battery and can be recharged in less than an hour. If a watch runs for a month on a coin battery it'll run for six on a LiPo that will fit into the same case.
 

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There's definitely a market and a new battery every 2-3 years is nothing. Also, easily solvable if also solar.
Solar doesn't provide extra power. The capacitor (think of it like a gas tank) is still limited in size. The problem with most motors sized for driving quartz movements is they consume more power than can be replaced by the battery while allowing a reasonable time between battery changes. If it's solar, it's not recharging the capacitor at a sufficient rate to keep the charge level up. It's possible solar watches could manage the power better by stopping the second hand when it senses there's low light, but that adds complexity to the movement and the power management system in the movement.

BTW (not directed at sdiver), the Bulova Precisionist accomplishes a relatively smooth sweep by incorporating a very large battery, and also limiting the size and weight of the second hand to require less torque to move it. You won't find a Precisionist with a diver type second hand that has a lumed larger portion on the hand. Even with the larger battery, a Precisionist battery still only lasts about 2-3 years. Some digital G-Shocks have smaller batteries that don't need replacement for 10 years.
 

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Accutrons aren't thermocompensated, so while they're capable of HAQ-like accuracy, they often aren't, especially as they age. They're also largely out of production, with the Lunar Pilot and Curve/Precisionist chronos being all that's left.
There are 30 available Precisionist models currently offered on the Bulova website. 14 of them are 3-handers.
 

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If it's solar, it's not recharging the capacitor at a sufficient rate to keep the charge level up. It's possible solar watches could manage the power better by stopping the second hand when it senses there's low light, but that adds complexity to the movement and the power management system in the movement.
Do you mean solar can't charge fast enough to keep a smooth second hand running?

My solar Casio stops all the hand movement and turns off the digital display when the light is low enough for a while. It wakes up each morning when I turn on the light. So that complexity has been solved and it's not expensive.
 

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There are 30 available Precisionist models currently offered on the Bulova website. 14 of them are 3-handers.
I'm seeing 21, with only 5 being three hands, but I see your point. Bulova had a large lineup of 262kHz and Precisionist models in the past and they were systematically purged and sold at significant discount over the past few years. I didn't realize the three hand models had come back.
 

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I like the discreet notation of a single second that quartz shows. And, as others have mentioned, deadbeat seconds in a mechanical watch was once a high complication. I'd pose the question the other way: why don't most mechanical watches have deadbeat seconds? Perhaps because it's more expensive to accomplish?
 

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Do you mean solar can't charge fast enough to keep a smooth second hand running?

My solar Casio stops all the hand movement and turns off the digital display when the light is low enough for a while. It wakes up each morning when I turn on the light. So that complexity has been solved and it's not expensive.
Yes. A solar powered watch stores power in a capacitor. The movement draws its power from the capacitor. If you're drawing more power than the solar cells can provide to replace it, you're basically draining the tank. Unless you spend most of your time outdoors in the sun, this is the Achilles heel of solar power being used to drive a more-or-less continuously moving second hand. There's still a lot of circuitry in a solar cell that is required to convert the collected electrical power to a form the watch circuitry can use.
 

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I don't believe sweep seconds are better nor have I been "successfully conditioned" to believe so, I just prefer the way it looks. Time never stops, and a ticking seconds hand only moves for a fraction of a millisecond, remaining still the vast majority of that same seconds it ticks. That to me is a fundamental flaw with the way it tells time, not to mention if it is supposed to highlight accuracy and time readability, then hitting the marks perfectly right is an absolute necessity.

But then again, I don't even need a seconds hand. My anordain hasn't got one and I live very well without it. I don't live my life to such precision.
Wow! Predictable that some people might be upset at the idea that the watch industry has conditioned them to think a certain way. But I didn't see this take coming:

"I don't think sweep seconds are better, I just think they're better... except when there's not one."
 

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Yes. A solar powered watch stores power in a capacitor. The movement draws its power from the capacitor. If you're drawing more power than the solar cells can provide to replace it, you're basically draining the tank. Unless you spend most of your time outdoors in the sun, this is the Achilles heel of solar power being used to drive a more-or-less continuously moving second hand. There's still a lot of circuitry in a solar cell that is required to convert the collected electrical power to a form the watch circuitry can use.
Yeah, I get that, it just wasn't clear (to me) in the original post that you were only saying solar can't drive a smooth second hand. Thanks for clarifying.
 

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Which is kind of a clue that the Swiss watch industry ultimately touted the supposed superiority of the sweep second hand as a way of fending off the onslaught of quartz movements when they presented a challenge to the status quo. IOW, we've been conditioned by successful marketing to believe sweep seconds are better, and for that matter mechanical movements in general too.

I, for one, can clearly see the fractional stutter of most sweep seconds, and find it slightly unnerving or disorienting when I pay close attention. Still, I like both automatic and quartz movements. But I don't find the motion of the second hand fundamentally relevant to choosing one over the other.
The sweeping or smooth running seconds hand has a history that goes way back to the pocket watch era. Mechanical wristwatches in the 1920's included sweeping seconds hands because they were useful and expected. During the quartz revolution of the 1970's and 1980's most watch buyers would have been aware of sweeping seconds hands. I don't recall that feature being touted by Swiss watch makers as better than the 1 second step design.
 

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D'OH!! These are the same low IQ people who drive 50mph in the left lane while texting !!! 馃槫馃槫
You didn't even need to say anything about texting bro
 
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Yes. A solar powered watch stores power in a capacitor. The movement draws its power from the capacitor. If you're drawing more power than the solar cells can provide to replace it, you're basically draining the tank. Unless you spend most of your time outdoors in the sun, this is the Achilles heel of solar power being used to drive a more-or-less continuously moving second hand. There's still a lot of circuitry in a solar cell that is required to convert the collected electrical power to a form the watch circuitry can use.
My Casio Oceanus stores solar power in a Panasonic CTL1025 solar lithium battery, not capacitor, and will stop running under certain no light no use conditions. It wakes up and jets to the proper atomic time, using sensors to make sure it hits the marks precisely.The only thing missing is the smooth sweep.
 

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During the quartz revolution of the 1970's and 1980's most watch buyers would have been aware of sweeping seconds hands. I don't recall that feature being touted by Swiss watch makers as better than the 1 second step design.
I do. If not by the manufacturers themselves, certainly by their dealers.
 

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That's about it. A continuously running motor, similar to the one found in wall clocks, would eat the battery pretty quickly.

The Bulova 262 kHz 3-hand movement (ticks 8 times a second) takes a battery more than twice the size of a conventional 32kHz crystal movement (once a second). Its battery is typically done in 2-3 years.
I second it.
 

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Usual cell is 377 or 371 which is 28 mah. Bulova uses CR 2016 which is 90 mah to have approximately same battery life. So, draw is 3 times of normal quartz. In normal quartz smaller CR2012 give 10 year battery life. So you shorten live on single cell by factor of 3. There is more wear and tear and frankly, i think, many people who buy inexpensive quartz watches don't give a thing about smooth seconds hand. You really don't care what time is it when seconds hand is in between markers. It's all for looks.
 
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