WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,884 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Because it tarnishes? I don't really get that.
People like bronze and patina and all that, so why aren't there any SILVER 925 bracelets?

I can imagine many really interesting designs.
But the only example I could find was this (not the best example what *I* think could be done with it, but...):
Watch bracelet SIlver.jpeg

I have nothing against that "biker style" and I do understand the criteria for a bracelet to be a WATCH bracelet.

But are you against the very idea of silver 925 for a bracelet?
Would you consider one if the design was "right" for you?
And if so, what sort of designs would you like to see?

It seems to me, that the material (Silver) would lend itself to a variety of designs that would be either difficult to do, or not as appropriate in stainless steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,542 Posts
I wouldn't want one, because (imo) the tarnish/patina that silver gets is a lot less appealing / visually interesting, compared to the tarnish/patina that bronze gets. (I've got a 925 silver ring, and the patina on it is.. not attractive).
Of course, this is highly subjective - maybe people who are really into bronze/brass patination (such as those posters who reportedly take their watches to bed under covers to let naturally expulsed methane patinate them more...) would be into silver patination too.


There might be a facotr of association too. For watches, brass and esp. bronze associates with ships and submarines and "manly old-school industrial stuff", where as silver.. that makes one think of silverware (i.e. silver tableware). Not quite as exotic...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
silver 0.925 I believe is sterling silver. sterling silver is fairly soft and if you think desk diving marks on stainless steel is bad I can only imagine how bad it would look on sterling silver. 100% sterling would probably cost more than stainless silver and plating would probably be a disaster. i am not sure about sterling would survive in salt water compared to stainless steel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,123 Posts
silver 0.925 I believe is sterling silver. sterling silver is fairly soft and if you think desk diving marks on stainless steel is bad I can only imagine how bad it would look on sterling silver. 100% sterling would probably cost more than stainless silver and plating would probably be a disaster. i am not sure about sterling would survive in salt water compared to stainless steel.
92.5% silver (sterling) would not be too soft. There have been many circulating coins made from at 90% silver and they took the abuse reasonably well.

Pure silver (99.9%) would be too soft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,822 Posts
92.5% silver (sterling) would not be too soft. There have been many circulating coins made from at 90% silver and they took the abuse reasonably well.

Pure silver (99.9%) would be too soft.
If we are actually talking about sterling, it's reasonably tough but will scratch. Sterling flat wear can take abuse, but it does require occasional polishing. Silver isn't very expensive compared to gold, and the small quantities needed for watches or bracelets wouldn't be cost prohibitive. When I see silver next to stainless, the "warmer" look is pretty obvious and more attractive. However, the tarnish is a pain and not attractive, IMO.

I have wondered why someone hasn't done something with nickel silver. Is the allergy issue that big?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
604 Posts
I used the word soft in that sterling scratches/scuffs easily--stainless steel has a higher mohs rating than sterling.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,839 Posts
It would be prone to develop tarnishing. I do have a 925 silver rhodium plated Must de Cartier rondo Quartz watch which after 24 years still looks like in brand new condition.

The problem with a 925 silver bracelet is that the moving links would result in wear of the plating allowing the underlying silver to become exposed which in turn would lead to tarnishing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,884 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
It could be tarnish related thing as a lot of old silver doesn't develop the pleasing patina of bronze it just looks dirty.

Wouldn't bikers - and others - like their watch looking partially dirteh?

Heck, I see people baking their dials in the oven for that "vintage" look.

I am sure not everyone likes their watch shiny and new-looking.
And silver takes the bruises so much more elegantly than steel, in that sense.
Desk diving marks would only add to the look.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,624 Posts
Of course, this is highly subjective - maybe people who are really into bronze/brass patination (such as those posters who reportedly take their watches to bed under covers to let naturally expulsed methane patinate them more...) would be into silver patination too.
Haha. I've never heard of that before. I've heard of the hard boiled egg in a ziplock bag trick, but not this, um, natural method.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,151 Posts
I have made watch bracelets out of .925 Silver.

In my opinion it has three main problems for the bracelet application. It's soft and shows scratches, it still tarnishes and it does not match most watch cases.

My only solution so far is to make the whole watch, case and all, out of .925. This way all the finishes would match.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,198 Posts
I have made watch bracelets out of .925 Silver.

In my opinion it has three main problems for the bracelet application. It's soft and shows scratches, it still tarnishes and it does not match most watch cases.

My only solution so far is to make the whole watch, case and all, out of .925. This way all the finishes would match.
^This.

Silver is much whiter than stainless steel. It's kind of like the difference between titanium and stainless.

This is a well worn .925 ring I made beside a well worn Seiko Sarb033 bracelet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,884 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I have made watch bracelets out of .925 Silver.

In my opinion it has three main problems for the bracelet application. It's soft and shows scratches, it still tarnishes and it does not match most watch cases.

My only solution so far is to make the whole watch, case and all, out of .925. This way all the finishes would match.
That's certainly one way to do it.
But do you not think a black case (PVD or whatever) would work well with silver - especially when partially tarnished?

I am looking at how silver biker jewelry is done, and there is a lot of black - onyx etc - that's used in tandem with silver, and it always looks fine.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,198 Posts
That's certainly one way to do it.
But do you not think a black case (PVD or whatever) would work well with silver - especially when partially tarnished?

I am looking at how silver biker jewelry is done, and there is a lot of black - onyx etc - that's used in tandem with silver, and it always looks fine.
Like all things artistic, whoever's doing it needs to have an 'eye'.

For me the black PVD finish of an entire watch head might not mix well unless it had some shiny silver accents on it.

Is this a hypothetical situation, or are you trying to design a biker-type watch and bracelet?
 

·
Moderator Public Forum
Joined
·
22,063 Posts
It could be tarnish related thing as a lot of old silver doesn't develop the pleasing patina of bronze it just looks dirty.
Both metals can corrode, oxidize, tarnish or develop a patina. Different names for the same thing.

Bronze and silver can be either attractively patinated or look grungy and dirty depending what one finds attractive.

The accumulation of silver patina on the surface and in the crevices of intricate vintage pieces is prized by collectors because it adds dimension. Removing all of it by dip cleaning gives the piece a flatter finish and may actually diminish value.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,924 Posts
Dunno 'bout bracelet use but part of the charm (for me) is the "dirty" look for my ochs. If/when I want the new and shiny version (middle pic), clean it up and off I go, holds up as well/better than most of my other watches to wear . . .
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,884 Posts
Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Like all things artistic, whoever's doing it needs to have an 'eye'.

For me the black PVD finish of an entire watch head might not mix well unless it had some shiny silver accents on it.

Is this a hypothetical situation, or are you trying to design a biker-type watch and bracelet?
Both.

Of course, I am aware that the WIS community is largely conservative, but I was thinking, there is always a niche market.
THIS is why something as "horrible" as Invicta sells - I'm speaking only of their styling and size, not necessarily for its built or functional quality.

And while most people here would say NO to the idea, I figured there might be enough bikers here who might say YES.

And, I have always liked silver jewelry, and a lot, if not all, of bikers are into Harley silver jewelry also.
It's just part of that culture.
So, I put 2 and 2 together to wonder about this - Why hasn't someone already done this? Is it the cost?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,198 Posts
Both.

Of course, I am aware that the WIS community is largely conservative, but I was thinking, there is always a niche market.
THIS is why something as "horrible" as Invicta sells.

And while most people here would say NO to the idea, I figured there might be enough bikers here who might say YES.

And, I have always liked silver jewelry, and a lot, if not all, of bikers are into Harley silver jewelry also.
It's just part of that culture.
So, I put 2 and 2 together to wonder about this - Why hasn't someone already done this? Is it the cost?
Probably the conservative-ness. Cost is negligible for the material. But you don't see a lot of industrial silver production for watch-stuff. So that leaves hand-making the stuff on a small scale which adds to the cost. But could add to perceived value as well.

I will admit to having similar ideas with regards to the Ed Hardy-types. And you see it being done by high-end guys like Richard Mille.

The problem is finding the price point.
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top