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Hi guys

I was just wondering why the speedmaster X-33 is a sapphire crystal and yet nasa approved it for space. I thought that the reason why the original speedmaster pro was chosen because it has a hesalite crystal that won't shatter in space? Thanks

Daryl
 

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Hi guys

I was just wondering why the speedmaster X-33 is a sapphire crystal and yet nasa approved it for space. I thought that the reason why the original speedmaster pro was chosen because it has a hesalite crystal that won't shatter in space? Thanks

Daryl
I think part of the answer to this question could be that the X-33 wasn't designed specifically for NASA. It was designed with the larger aviation community in mind. An anti-reflective, scratch resistant crystal is very useful for maintaining legibility of an aviation watch. I suspect that most of the pilots who had input to the design asked for this? It would be good to hear whether this was the case from someone "in the know."
Another part of the answer may be that the X-33 is not certified for EVA; it's for use in pressurised environments only. NASA still have the good old Speedy Pro for this purpose (who knows when the last time one was actually worn on an ISS EVA?! The last watch I'm aware of that was worn EVA on the ISS was the Seiko Springdrive). So, I suspect that there was no push from with NASA for the X-33 to have a hesalite crystal as it wasn't intended to be exposed to the hard vacuum of space, and as a digital watch may not function at such extremes of temperature/radiation anyway?
Hope this helps?

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think part of the answer to this question could be that the X-33 wasn't designed specifically for NASA. It was designed with the larger aviation community in mind. An anti-reflective, scratch resistant crystal is very useful for maintaining legibility of an aviation watch. I suspect that most of the pilots who had input to the design asked for this? It would be good to hear whether this was the case from someone "in the know."
Another part of the answer may be that the X-33 is not certified for EVA; it's for use in pressurised environments only. NASA still have the good old Speedy Pro for this purpose (who knows when the last time one was actually worn on an ISS EVA?! The last watch I'm aware of that was worn EVA on the ISS was the Seiko Springdrive). So, I suspect that there was no push from with NASA for the X-33 to have a hesalite crystal as it wasn't intended to be exposed to the hard vacuum of space, and as a digital watch may not function at such extremes of temperature/radiation anyway?
Hope this helps?

Jim
Hi

Thanks for your post! I think all your arguments seem like plausible reasons that Omega changed it to a sapphire crystal. Thanks!:-!
 

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Another part of the answer may be that the X-33 is not certified for EVA; it's for use in pressurised environments only. NASA still have the good old Speedy Pro for this purpose (who knows when the last time one was actually worn on an ISS EVA?! The last watch I'm aware of that was worn EVA on the ISS was the Seiko Springdrive). So, I suspect that there was no push from with NASA for the X-33 to have a hesalite crystal as it wasn't intended to be exposed to the hard vacuum of space, and as a digital watch may not function at such extremes of temperature/radiation anyway?
Hope this helps?

Jim
I think there's some truth, here. The X-33 is used as the primary interior watch, but the Speedmaster Professional is still used for EVAs.

The Speedmaster Professional was used in an EVA (albeit by the Russians, but on the ISS) as recently as March of 2009. See: http://www.omegawatches.com/index.php?id=81&tx_ttnews[pS]=1235862000&tx_ttnews[pL]=1238536799&tx_ttnews[arc]=1&tx_ttnews[cat]=1%2C2&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=1112&cHash=ed631d3f5a

Otherwise, if you look at all the "Updates from Space" sections on Omega's website, you'll see more X-33s than you can shake a stick at (e.g., http://www.omegawatches.com/index.php?id=81&tx_ttnews[pS]=1254348000&tx_ttnews[pL]=1257029999&tx_ttnews[arc]=1&tx_ttnews[cat]=1%2C2&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=1191&cHash=ca80b8bd1a).

Note: Cut and paste entire link--they're getting spliced for some reason.
 

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I think there's some truth, here. The X-33 is used as the primary interior watch, but the Speedmaster Professional is still used for EVAs.

The Speedmaster Professional was used in an EVA (albeit by the Russians, but on the ISS) as recently as March of 2009. See: http://www.omegawatches.com/index.php?id=81&tx_ttnews[pS]=1235862000&tx_ttnews[pL]=1238536799&tx_ttnews[arc]=1&tx_ttnews[cat]=1%2C2&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=1112&cHash=ed631d3f5a

Otherwise, if you look at all the "Updates from Space" sections on Omega's website, you'll see more X-33s than you can shake a stick at (e.g., http://www.omegawatches.com/index.php?id=81&tx_ttnews[pS]=1254348000&tx_ttnews[pL]=1257029999&tx_ttnews[arc]=1&tx_ttnews[cat]=1%2C2&tx_ttnews[tt_news]=1191&cHash=ca80b8bd1a).

Note: Cut and paste entire link--they're getting spliced for some reason.
Thanks a lot for the post with evidence of recent excursions of the Speedy Pro into hard vacuum!
 
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