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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is in response to comments in the "Omega X-33 Cal. 1666D TC Movement Accuracy Tracking" - thread.

Why are these tests at one temperature important?
I don't want to keep my watch at one temperature in real life, so why bother?

If you know how well the watch performs at one temperature, you can see how it performs at another. You can compare performances at different temperatures. You measure the effectiveness of the thermo compensation.

The effectiveness of the thermo-compensation is what we're really after. A well performing thermo compensation makes for an accurate watch 'in real life'.

It is terribly involved to set up a rig to keep the temperature constant. And it takes forever to take measurements. It may not be your thing after just buying a new watch.

May be later, when you're scratching your head about why your watch did so well this year, and so badly last.
 

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I have no idea what comment you're responding to. Literally no one questioned if measurements at one temperature are important. More importantly measurements at one temperature are no more important than measurements taken at multiple temperatures in determining how effective the TC employed by a watch.

The question you should ask your self and the one that any scientist asks the minute they make a hypothesis and design an experiment is how much data do they need to answer the hypothesis, and how and when do you issue your results and conclusions. Essentially when do you pull the plug on collecting data in the same manner, and use the data you have to reduce your sampling and confirm your conclusions.

It doesn't necessarily take a long time or bucket loads of data to determine how well a watch or any product can perform, if it did than products would take forever to reach the market. There is a segment of established statistics devoted to sample size, and testing frequency designed to minimize the testing time and data required to answer with high probability how a product is performing now and will in the future. For a quartz watch COSC can do the job in 13 days, and I haven't heard any complaints on Breitlings meeting and exceeding COSC specs.

So getting back to Gaijin's thread, based on his last 40 weeks of data, next weeks data (assuming the same design) for the spy result will be, the average of the prevoius 40 weeks plus or minus 2 times the standard deviation of the previous results. If that's not the result, than his previous data is meaningless, or something is wrong with his watch, measuements, or temperature.

So Hans, are you saying its time to move onto other temperatures now that you have one temp defined and answer those TC questions, or are you saying something else.

Might add I don't think anyone is scratching their head on how their normally operating HAQ watches are performing year to year, they don't vary that much. The Certina's, Bulova's, Breitling's, GS's, Citizen's, and Gaiijin's Omega all perform pretty much the same year to year based on bucket loads of data here on this forum.
 
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