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Discussion Starter #1
The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.
― Marcel Proust


One of the things I like best about my watch hobby is that just when I think I have it all figured out, something comes along and shows me that there's more. My resignation to the fact that I basically don't like the looks of tourbillon (T) watches is one such thing. Time and time again I'd see them and even knowing what they represent horologically, they just didn't do the most important thing to me about every watch I own: they don't look good to my eye. Accordingly, I'd pretty much come to grips with the fact that I just would not ever buy a "T" watch, and frankly given how much they cost, I just figured, "Well, good for me. At least there's something about my hobby that is going to "save" me some money." LOL

Recently, I happened to grab one of the I had the good fortune (or maybe not, depending on how one looks at it...LOL) to discover a "T" watch that upon first laying eyes upon it, I thought, "Wow! That's gorgeous!" I've never thought that about any "T" watch before. The closest I came to it was with the G&B skeletonized "T" pieces that made me sort of toy with the idea of buying one and "killing two birds with one stone: skeleton and "T." I'm not particularly fond of either of those things, but I felt that given the "greatest hits" sort of theme around which I'm collecting, I should probably have one of each just to represent the genre.

Well, you know what they say...never say never. The prospect of my actually owning a "T" watch just went up. I'm at least at a point where I've come across one I am willing to consider. So what is it?








Okay. I'm sure some of you may have seen this before, but I hadn't, and I certainly haven't seen mention of his watches in the HEW subforum. Thus this post. Also, it's the only "T" watch I know of that uses a spring detent escapement (SDE).

I'm not an movement junkie, and yes, I know SDEs are comparatively fragile and they are not self-starting, which hampers their practicality in a wrist borne applications. But practicality isn't at all the point for me and "Ts." It's not like one, even Rieber's, would become something I wear more than a few times...ever. It's the novelty, innovation and the fact that the thing looks pretty decent as go "Ts" in my eyes. There is an upside to SDEs. They don't require oiling, which why they were implemented as marine chronometers, perhaps most notably by John Arnold. (I've seen the actual invention of the SDE variously attributed to Le Roy, Arnold and Earnshaw.) Maybe this is just the watch to wear sailing? LOL...JK.
















Wilhelm Rieber comes from a long line of watchmakers dating to the 18th century, but he's the first among them to make his own cased pieces. Interestingly, he also seems to have no staff who aid him in making his pieces, thus the "stupidly" low production volume of two per year. That said, given the level of detail in his pieces, all of which is 100% hand done, it's pretty amazing to me that he can crank out one in six months. Like Roland at RGM and Keaton Myrick, he is a master watchmaker who also performs watch and clock restorations. For a bit more info about Mr. Rieber and what he does, you may care to check out the following:






FWIW, Rieber is the watchmaker who produced Maybach automobile branded watches (not with the SDE). (The watches and cars were sold separately. LOL) One more stereotype bites the dust, that is if it hadn't already.





All the best.


Perhaps, after all, [nothing] never has been discovered. I myself would say that it had merely been detected.
― Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray


P.S.
I thought it at once funny and sad that spellcheck "thinks" I've misspelled "Rieber," suggesting "Bieber" as the alternative. LOL
-- Tony20009
 

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My thoughts mimic yours in that the watch has to catch my eye and hold it before I'd consider it. This one does look interesting but not enough to warrant anything further thankfully. If/when I know you will give us a great review . . .
 
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Discussion Starter #4
My thoughts mimic yours in that the watch has to catch my eye and hold it before I'd consider it. This one does look interesting but not enough to warrant anything further thankfully. If/when I know you will give us a great review . . .
Don't hold your breath. LOL I'm moved by this one to actually look into one and to spend some time handling one if I can. I'm still a long way from committing to buying one, yet insofar as I was all but set on just not having a "T," where I am now is long way from where I was a month ago. <winks>

All the best.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Checkout the Christian Klings - Tourbillon Nr. 7
What? Have you determined that I should someday own a "T" watch? LOL


TY for the suggestion. His pieces are smart looking as well and the nod to modernity he incorporates by making the SDE self-starting is a real boon. The #2 is the one that most catches my interest.








CK #7








The asymmetry of the #12 is really cool looking too. I especially like how the minimalist character of the face is echoed in the movement finishing/styling.






All the best.
 
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I probably shouldn't comment, since, without even knowing the price, I'm sure it's way out of my league. Nevertheless...while I like the design, I would expect nicer finishing for the bridges and other exposed bits than I'm seeing in those pictures. Perhaps the pictures aren't great; I'm not opposed to industrial type finishing, but to me it's not in keeping with the look of the dial and other elements. So, like you, Tony, whew! Lots of money saved. ;-)
 

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Tony: Are my eyes deceiving me and that watch's beating at half dead seconds ???
You noticed that, eh? <smiles>

I don't have documentation indicating that's what it's doing, but it looks that way to me; it's quite precise looking for me to presume it's simply a consequence of beat rate alone. I also do not know whether Rieber uses the constant force or train remontoires. I can't pretend to be a movement guy and as such I don't know whether looking like they are dead seconds or not is typical of tourbillons or whether that is something that must always be incorporated. That said, I'll be honest, I haven't ever seen any "T" watches that don't look like they aren't showing dead beat seconds. Whether that's a function of beat rate or the maker expressly slowing the motion, I cannot say, but I can say that for most of them I've seen and noticed (which is the point here of my noting my not being "into" movements), the stops look a lot like 21.6K beat rate stops.

I'm sorry I don't know, but I don't.


Ancillary Thoughts:
You can see what appear to be even greater degrees of seconds delineation in the stops this one makes, but they look beat rate caused, though it could well be my eyesight or the angle at which the image is depicted.


FPJ has an implementation of dead seconds too, though his seconds display or don't depending on whether the reserve is full. Also, his implementation makes it really hard to connect the escapements motion with that of the second hand. (Ian Skellern has written an excellent discussion of dead beat seconds and this watch.)


This one is reported as being a dead beat seconds watch, but it doesn't look like seconds and if it's less than seconds, the increments are so small it looks continuous to me, which, of course, continuity is a consequence of high beat rates (a la Rolex's "sweep" ads of days long gone) and the eye's inability to distinguish such small and fast jumps, thus making one wonder about notion of going to the bother to make dead beat seconds only to use such small increments that one can't readily tell that one went through all that trouble. Make no mistake, however, in my mind, that's the sort of thing "geeky" watchmakers would do merely because they can. LOL



What are your thoughts?

All the best.
 

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On top and bottom , it looks like continuous motion. On the FPJ , when the power reserve is maxed , it look deadbeat--to me.

It's a good thing I don't have a tourbillion as I'd be looking at it all the time. I waste enough time , now , changing straps , looking thru the back , and other bad habits. I truly don't want a new one.
 
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