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COSC tests at 100% power reserve to the best of my knowledge.
Maybe, but that wouldn't be a real world test since sedentary usage is about 1/3 wind. If the watch times to +/- 0/day at 100% wind it could end up -5/day in average sedentary usage.
 

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Maybe, but that wouldn't be a real world test since sedentary usage is about 1/3 wind. If the watch times to +/- 0/day at 100% wind it could end up -5/day in average sedentary usage.
Yep, which is why metas et al testing is much better than COSC. Hell CWard has COSC watches for gods sake.


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Discussion Starter #23
My watch was running perfectly at +0.5 spd for a year and then was running at +10 spd. Had it serviced under warranty and they fixed it for free even though it was due to extreme shock which is not covered under warranty. Only shock that it would have experienced was me firing maybe a hundred rounds of 9mm with the watch on my off hand wrist. So I take my quartz to the range now even if my watch is suppose to be able to handle it, just in case.
Thanks for that information. I am not familiar with the forces on the range but I cant imagine wearing on the off hand while shooting can provide that kind of shock?
Guess I will continue tracking my watch for some time to come and keep my fingers crossed, but I feel a bit of disappointment already...
 

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Maybe, but that wouldn't be a real world test since sedentary usage is about 1/3 wind. If the watch times to +/- 0/day at 100% wind it could end up -5/day in average sedentary usage.
I don't know how you define "sedentary usage"... The first time I did the power down test I had not wound up my watch for at least a month. But I was wearing it for over 23.5 hrs a day, in office, driving, at home, sleeping etc.. taking it off only for my time in the shower.. and my activity level is quite low anyway, no running, exercising, etc. and only work at my desk, mostly on the note book or other keypads. Not even walking (my Samsung phone records less than 3000 steps typically for the whole day) I got 60 hours indicating an almost full wind. For the second test I had wound it up some 50 turns 5 days before (at end of the first test) but it was on my wrist for 5 days before the test too...
 

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Yep, which is why metas et al testing is much better than COSC. Hell CWard has COSC watches for gods sake.


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METAS is only a certification, shouldn't mean that the watches from the majors like omega and not certified will not perform like the certified ones! I would have expected all high end luxury watches would be compliant whether certified or not on all aspects except the magnetic resistance that is currently special only for Omega master co-axials.
 

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I don't know how you define "sedentary usage"... The first time I did the power down test I had not wound up my watch for at least a month. But I was wearing it for over 23.5 hrs a day, in office, driving, at home, sleeping etc.. taking it off only for my time in the shower.. and my activity level is quite low anyway, no running, exercising, etc. and only work at my desk, mostly on the note book or other keypads. Not even walking (my Samsung phone records less than 3000 steps typically for the whole day) I got 60 hours indicating an almost full wind. For the second test I had wound it up some 50 turns 5 days before (at end of the first test) but it was on my wrist for 5 days before the test too...
"sedentary usage," about 1/3 wind was what COSC insider told me movements are tested at. I don't know what he told me is true or not, but it makes sense: test how watches are worn.
 

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METAS is only a certification, shouldn't mean that the watches from the majors like omega and not certified will not perform like the certified ones! I would have expected all high end luxury watches would be compliant whether certified or not on all aspects except the magnetic resistance that is currently special only for Omega master co-axials.
Not really. A watch with one barrel (mainspring) will have a hard time passing the power reserve test (accuracy delta at 100% to 30%).


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The theory is aesthetically pleasing, but the practice is uglier , and to note - I've been watching my '78 Seiko 5606-5000 on my right wrist against a Bulova Lunar Pilot or a Swatch Blue Rebel on the left , both the latters reliable timekeepers against the quirky mechanicalness of the Seiko (though the Bulova shows up the Swatch as being fast-tendentious) : the Seiko does cheer up when worn , and gains 5s per 24h , and settles back into moodiness when cast aside , and will retract somewhat (unmeasured) into slight negative . While I no longer take mechanicals seriously, wearing quartz for practical purpose, and mechanical only for the sake of keeping the thing road-worthy, my input may go to show that the internet lore of mechanicals gaining when near spring depletion, while losing when fully wound , is crap .
 

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All my watches run faster as they run down except right at the end when it slows back down again. It’s because the amplitude drop as the main spring loses power so the balance wheel is oscillating a tad quicker.
 

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All my watches run faster as they run down except right at the end when it slows back down again. It’s because the amplitude drop as the main spring loses power so the balance wheel is oscillating a tad quicker.
I understand the 'amplitude' thing, though it still does not absolve mechanicals from doing an accurate job of timekeeping. The one mechanical I had which did a fine job of 0/0 near- quartz precision whatever and probably merited its chronometer rating was an '80s Rolex 15000 (with a broken manual wind) , unfortunately robbed, among two other Rolexes , also robbed; a really, really fine watch. But for today's days, for understated status, precision and ruggedness , my consumer dream is a Casio G-Shock DW5600-e, and I'm wondering if I will or if I won't treat myself :)
 

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I don't know how you define "sedentary usage"... The first time I did the power down test I had not wound up my watch for at least a month. But I was wearing it for over 23.5 hrs a day, in office, driving, at home, sleeping etc.. taking it off only for my time in the shower.. and my activity level is quite low anyway, no running, exercising, etc. and only work at my desk, mostly on the note book or other keypads. Not even walking (my Samsung phone records less than 3000 steps typically for the whole day) I got 60 hours indicating an almost full wind. For the second test I had wound it up some 50 turns 5 days before (at end of the first test) but it was on my wrist for 5 days before the test too...
Sorry for jumping into the middle of this discussion.

When I want to check the positional variance of a watch, I wind full, set the time to an atomic clock and place it in the position of measure. Let it sit overnight and then record the time/variation.

However, the easiest method, without buying a Timegrapher, is to use an app like WatchTracker and record real-life daily accuracy and precision.
 
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