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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

So recently I was told that an automatic watch has to have the crown wound every once in a while. Is this true? I thought that an automatic watch is wound by the movement of your wrist? Why should turning the crown affect its time keeping? Can someone explain this to me? The watch that I'm wearing is an Oris Big Crown Pointer Date 634 movement.



Jimmy
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Thanks again to Arrow269 for this beautiful watch and awesome transaction, he was patient and very informative.


Jimmy
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It depends on the machine. Your Oris has the 634 cal. If memory serves me right, it is based on ETA 2824-2, so you can charge the power reserve automatically (just wear and move around) or manually (hand winding). Others like cal 735 is based on Sellita SW 200, so it can only be charged automatically.

Correct me if I'm wrong.


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There's really no need if you have at least a moderate level of physical activity, the rotor is adequate. Some automatic movements (for example the ETA 2824) have quite delicate keyless works and although they can be hand-wound, it doesn't mean they should be.
 

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It depends on the machine. Your Oris has the 634 cal. If memory serves me right, it is based on ETA 2824-2, so you can charge the power reserve automatically (just wear and move around) or manually (hand winding). Others like cal 735 is based on Sellita SW 200, so it can only be charged automatically.

Correct me if I'm wrong.


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Yes, you are wrong.

ETA 2824 and SW200 are the same movement (just made by different companies). They are both primarily wound by the rotor (automatic) but can both be wound with the crown if necessary (manual).

If the watch is worn everyday, there is no need whatsoever to manually wind this movement.

If the watch has stopped due to not being worn for over 40hrs, then yes, manually wind it until it starts then set the time and put it back on the wrist and let the automatic system take over.
 

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Yes, you are wrong.

ETA 2824 and SW200 are the same movement (just made by different companies). They are both primarily wound by the rotor (automatic) but can both be wound with the crown if necessary (manual).

If the watch is worn everyday, there is no need whatsoever to manually wind this movement.

If the watch has stopped due to not being worn for over 40hrs, then yes, manually wind it until it starts then set the time and put it back on the wrist and let the automatic system take over.
Thank you for the correction sir, much appreciated.


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And even if your 2824 does wind down it's far easier to just hold it in your hand and move it side to side a few times. It'll spin the rotor enough to start the watch.
 

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Your watch uses the ETA base so you will have no need to wind it. Oris made the switch to using Sellita movements. The SW200 movements charge just fine and it was only some of the SW220s that I found my semi-torpid way of life wouldn't charge well.
 

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And even if your 2824 does wind down it's far easier to just hold it in your hand and move it side to side a few times. It'll spin the rotor enough to start the watch.
This. The keyless works in a movement are a wear point.There's no real reason to wind by hand. In fact- the lower end Seiko movements take the keyless works out altogether to further simplify the watch and subtract one more thing that could break
 

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Yes, you are wrong.

ETA 2824 and SW200 are the same movement (just made by different companies). They are both primarily wound by the rotor (automatic) but can both be wound with the crown if necessary (manual).

If the watch is worn everyday, there is no need whatsoever to manually wind this movement.

If the watch has stopped due to not being worn for over 40hrs, then yes, manually wind it until it starts then set the time and put it back on the wrist and let the automatic system take over.
Wouldn't it just be better to shake it so the rotor can make a couple revolutions? IIRC, hand-winding watches with movements like the ETA 2824 can be done, but isn't necessarily recommended.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks guys for the info. Definitely was worth the post.


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There is no need to ever wind the watch assuming your wear it and are active enough to wind it automatically via the rotor.
 
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