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:oops: The thread topic didn't mention "thinnest mechanical watch" any where!
It didn't, but I think the implication is that it is easier to make a quartz watch thin.

The Edge is not the thinnest watch ever, but it is the thinnest currently in production. And it is an utterly amazing watch to see up close.


Getting back to mechanicals, I still want to know what is powering that Miramar.
 

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Interesting thread guys, the mechanicals cant really compete with the quartz watches for thinness by their very nature. In the early 80s the race was on between Switzerland and Japan to produce the "worlds thinnest watch", the result was a solid 18ct gold cased watch produced by ETA-commonly known as the Delirium (in fact a model name owned by Concord) only 1.98mm thick .This case was then branded and sold by various Swiss companies Concord, Longines, Sarcar, IWC, Eterna- to name a few. The thinnest i have come across however is the Omega Dinosaure, a hugely expensive quartz just 1.48mm thick. Omega produced a few "collectors" watches even thinner at 1.35mm but these were found to break/bend when worn !!
Heres a few pics of some of mine including my mechanical Piaget (cal P31) just 3mm thick
(measurements are total case thickness not just movement)
Omega Dinosaure 1.48mm (pound coin each side)

Sarcar Gloriums 1.98mm

Sarcar (side view)

Longines "Golden Leaf"

Piaget "Tradition" mechanical 3mm

Concord "Delirium" as retailed by Tiffany in the 80s
 

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That is a nice collection! The advert ads a nice touch to the presentation. Thanks for the data and pics. Stop back again!!!

I love the Concord with the transparent dial so you can see part of the PCB (printed circuit board).
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 · (Edited)
The Miramar I started this thread with had an issue. Face down it would stop dead and positionally it would loose time otherwise, showed up after a couple days running. I noticed the seller has put it back up on ebay without having it serviced so beware if you go to grab that piece. I know the seller, he stopped the original listing and sold to me, used to live near me B4 moving back to HK, but I feel for the guy who ends up with this piece, I was simply not willing to play with it and the issues will show up again. He said there seems to be no problem yet it was consistent issue after a couple days I had it



Jim
 

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Don't you hate it when you are reminded of somthing but just can't put your finger on it? All this thin movement talk- especially mechanical movements (I don't look at quartz watches the same way I do at Mechanical, the mechanical to me seem ALIVE)
I was sure it was Girard Perregaux but I can't find it on thier site, that made the world's thinnest automatic in the late sixties- all records are made to be broken of course, but this watch had a solid gold rotor and was only made in limited run, who knows what the hell I am recalling here? Cant be too many watches had a solid gold rotor.
 

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D
I was sure it was Girard Perregaux but I can't find it on thier site, that made the world's thinnest automatic in the late sixties- all records are made to be broken of course, but this watch had a solid gold rotor and was only made in limited run, who knows what the hell I am recalling here? Cant be too many watches had a solid gold rotor.
Universal made the thinnest automatic movement, the Universal 66, introduced in 1966. It was 2.5 mm in height.

Checkout the entry on Roland Ranfft's site: Universal 66
 

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How thick was the final product?
Measuring by eye (and with a plastic ruler), mine comes in at about 6mm including the crystal. But the crystal might not be the original - its a bit more domed than necessaery.
 

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I was browsing this old thread and thought i'd post what i consider IS "the worlds thinnest watch"-the definitive answer, though it would be great if someone proved me wrong

Concord Delirium IV-toal case thickness 0.98mm
As a fellow collector put it "like wearing a piece of bog-roll that tells the time" :-d



 

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Here are two from the Zenith catalogue year 2000. :)

1) Elite auto, winding in both directions, height: 3.28 mm.


2) Manual Elite HW movement: 2.83 mm.
 

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Hi guys,

I recently made acquisition of 2 watches well known for their thin cases and just would like to share with you few pictures that I just took of it.

On the first hand, there is a Concord Delirium with manual winding movement in platinum case.

This watch is one of the ninety seven produced in 1997 by Concord to celebrate the Hong Kong handover, which explains the special engravings of the case back design.

It is not the thinnest delirium around but probably the thinnest to include a manual winding movement, which is besides very nicely decorated.

The movement is very accurate and the feeling of the watch on my wrist is excellent. The contrast between the extravagant case back and the very simple dial is also something which I appreciated very much.

Concerning the platinum case, I have to say I am very pleased because it would not scratch as easily as gold would do and it feels also much more special. It is useless to say however that considering the caliber of the watch I am not planning to wear it on an everyday basis.

On the second hand, I just bought this Swatch Jelly Skin dated 1998. As it is very common to hear that Swatch Skin was inspired by Concord Delirium I found pleasant to put both together.

Obviously there is no competition between those watches;not only because one is quartz movement and the other one is manual winding but also due to the gap between the level of quality of each time piece.

Nevertheless, the Jelly Skin is also interesting because it gives a better idea on how all the Skin series were made.

I hope you enjoy the pics.

Cheers,

DK














 

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Very interesting juxtaposition!! The Swatch seems just as thin... wow. Both are very nice looking.
 

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I am glad you appreciate the juxtaposition. In the pictures both watches have a thickness of approximately 4mm.

The Swatch skin remains therefore very far from the 0,98 mm thickness which was once reached by the Concord quartz delirium.
 

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You're lucky to have the original crystal. Mine (a 1961 Vympel-branded version) needed a replacement glass and the only available was too tall. A flat watch needs the right glass.

For all those on this forum not aquainted with Russian watches, to give an idea of how thin the calibre 2209 was; when the Minsk watch factory decided to convert to a quartz movement in this thin case in 1988/89, they had to deepen the caseback to accomodate the battery.
Actually this could give a better indication of the battery size they used at the time.
 

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I remembered coming across this small article a while back, about the Concord Delirium and the arms race that watch companies had in the 70's to develop the thinnest wristwatch:

http://www.capetowncorp.com/whatsnew/concordarticle.html

The trick to the Delirium is in last paragraph:
"The chief reason the Delirium was so skinny was that the movement had no main plate. Instead, the watch components were fitted into the case back. It was an ingenious idea, one ETA used later when it designed the Swatch."
And the best part:
"....the Delirium IV, was an amazing .98mm thick, so delicate it could not be worn because the case would bend when you strapped the watch to your wrist."
So ETA won the thin wristwatch wars by making a watch that couldn't actually be worn!
:-d
Maybe I'm wrong, but I remember reading somewhere that, like the Delirium IV, some of the watches with the Poljot 2200 were so thin that they could be easily damaged because the case would flex while being strapped on.

I have 3 Luch watches with Poljot 2209 movements-- the machinery was transfered from Poljot to the Luch factory in 1975, I believe.
They all use the same classic case: the watches are about 7mm thick-- but 3mm of that is the domed crystal.
 

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Mod. Russian, China Mech.
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Actually this could give a better indication of the battery size they used at the time.
Equivalent to a Renata 373 i.e. 9.5x1.6mm. Not a fat battery.
 

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"....the Delirium IV, was an amazing .98mm thick, so delicate it could not be worn because the case would bend when you strapped the watch to your wrist."
So ETA won the thin wristwatch wars by making a watch that couldn't actually be worn!
:-d
Unlike the Titan Edge currently in production, which with a 3ATM water resistance, steel case and sapphire crystal (probably to stiffen the case :-x) probably makes it the thinnest practical watch of all time.

Maybe I'm wrong, but I remember reading somewhere that, like the Delirium IV, some of the watches with the Poljot 2200 were so thin that they could be easily damaged because the case would flex while being strapped on.
Maybe this is why Mark Gordon's 2200 is the only one known to still exist.



1.85mm movement height


3.5mm case height


(check out the entire collection |> http://www.ussrtime.com)
 
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