WatchUSeek Watch Forums banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
SAM_6452 (2).JPG SAM_6453 (2).JPG SAM_6457.JPG SAM_6458.JPG
I would like to know the history of this watch, like the watch company and how this watch was used. I believe granddad used it for a stop watch with the race horses. Any information would be gratefully appreciated. Thank you.
 

·
Premium Member
IWC Porsche Design Titan, IWC Pilot Spitfire, Sinn EZM 10
Joined
·
5,020 Posts
Looks to have original dial. Likely late 40-early 50's. I'm guessing a Landeron movement (48?). These were very basic movements, not very fancy, but years after they were (cheaply) sold, the old Landeron movements have proven to be pretty durable little machines. The back is stainless steel but the case front is chromed brass. These watches were typically sold as inexpensive (relative to "name brand" watches) souvenirs to folks who visited Switzerland and wanted to buy a Swiss watch. As such, many of the names on the dials were not really established watch manufacturers. I have no recollection of the name on your watch, but perhaps someone will come along with better information?
Side note: if it hasn't been serviced in more than a few years, don't try to run it as the lubrication is probably dry and running it could cause damage.

Edit: on the US eBay site, there are 30 Nisus watches listed, in a variety of styles. Perhaps there was more to Nisus than I thought, but I still have no further information on the brand. One of the items listed was a chronograph that has a Valjoux 22 movement (a higher quality movement than the Landeron that I am guessing is in the one you have). Is there a chance you could have a qualified watchmaker remove the rear cover so you can snap a clear photo of the movement? The manufacturer of the movement usually put a mark under the balance wheel at the edge of the movement.

Also found some results using a search engine on the internet, but I presumed you have already done that? There are some clues here on WatchUSeek as well:

https://www.watchuseek.com/f11/nisus-wrist-watch-1024302.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,752 Posts
I have nothing to add, other than that's a cool old chronograph from your grandfather. The fact that it's not a "known" name shouldn't deter you from getting it oiled/serviced and wearing it on occasion. Looks to be in pretty good shape, but like Time Exposure said, don't wind/wear it until you get it cleaned. Also, don't let them replace any external parts.

Edit - I would let them replace the crystal if need be, but it looks like it could just be polished up. Polywatch (~$5 for a small tube that will last years) will do it nicely. Toothpaste works in a pinch. And if you do wear it (after servicing), just remember that it's not water resistant at all, and probably not that shock resistant, so don't wear it swimming or to the gym.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,476 Posts
From https://www.watchuseek.com/f11/nisus-wrist-watch-1024302.html "According to Mikrolisk.de, Nisus was a brand by Fabrique d'Horlogerie Nisus SA / Dreyfus Freres SA of Péry, Switzerland. It was founded in 1903 and the brand name 'Nisus' was registered in 1931. The company was deleted from the commercial register in 1970. For all I know they used third-party-movements, like ETA, AS or FHF."

I have one from an antique dealer's junk box. It has an AS1131 Wehrmacht movement, which I was just corrected on by ffritz on the watchmaker board as not being made specifically for the German Wehrmacht but complying to a Swiss Army (also called the Wehrmacht) specification. None of this is applicable to your watch, but my impression is that it was a going concern in the first half of the twentieth century, only to be killed by the quartz crisis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,752 Posts
BTW, one thing I love about these old chronographs is the larger hash marks at 3, 6, and 9 minutes. Those are there to measure long distance phone calls, which were charged in 3 minute increments. You didn't want to hang up after 4 minutes, you wanted to talk for another 1:50 to get your money's worth. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,768 Posts
BTW, one thing I love about these old chronographs is the larger hash marks at 3, 6, and 9 minutes. Those are there to measure long distance phone calls, which were charged in 3 minute increments. You didn't want to hang up after 4 minutes, you wanted to talk for another 1:50 to get your money's worth. :)
Man, you would do good on 'Watch' Jeopardy....
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top