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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As we know smartphones change constantly. Couple of months you will be getting a new version OS. A year or two you will be getting a brand new phone hardware. Even Bluetooth is moving from version 4 to 5, probably in not so distant future v6! A smart watch with a display and functions completely relied on the phone would become a paper weight, when it's no longer compatible. That wouldn't take long at all.

Casio kind of taken a middle approach, adding Smartphone Link or Connected Engine (whatever their marketing terms) to a traditional looking digital or analog watch. While these can function on their own as a regular watch, they do lose half of their functions when they fall behind to technology. I read couple of manuals for these watches, I noticed they put the instructions for setting the watch with smartphone first, then instructions for manual setup with buttons next. So that's how important they see the connected functionality. But the 1st half of that manual will be useless when the watch can no longer operate with a smartphone. You would have to turn to the last half of the manual for the less friendly buttons operations.



So do you think these watches will lose their values faster than regular watches? Or would they still retain their values due to their physical aesthetics alone, even when they can no longer be connected?
 

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Back in March, I sponsored a Kickstarter project that was made by a watch company called Alpina for a new ABC watch called the AlpinerX. It was a cool concept, which is why I sponsored it. After I received it in June, I quickly learned the “Connected” feature wasn’t always beneficial. The watch “relied” on a smartphone connection to change settings, calibrate the watch, etc.

The smart watches or “connected” watches are convenient but you rely on watch manufacturers to update the app, etc. A good way to cycle watches out more frequently. I can adjust all settings, add widgets, etc on my Garmin Independant of my phone.

It will be interesting to see what Casio does long term, because their business model entails collectors, people wanting different color variations of the same watch.
 

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Well, it depends on the reputation of Casio concerning their continued support of their software. Bluetooth Casio watches are fairly new game, so it's early to say, but we'll see in a year or two how Casio handles Android/iOS updates, new bt standards, etc. So far there are mixed reports (see the useful thread linked below). Some members experience difficulties when upgrading to newer Android verions. Personally I haven't tried any bt G, but always felt with other Japanese products (like smartphones, cars, home entertainment) that quality-, and hardware-wise they were top notch, but equipped with below-par software.

https://www.watchuseek.com/f17/g-shock-connected-what-your-experience-so-far-4823943.html

That said, Casio seems to make a point about having all essential feautres available from the watch proper (albeit more fiddly than via bt), which should help the watch keep the value even if the connected features become unreliable.
 

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always felt with other Japanese products (like smartphones, cars, home entertainment) that quality-, and hardware-wise they were top notch, but equipped with below-par software.
Unless we are talking, like, game consoles or home computer systems of yesteryears :) hehe! The quality of software is absolutely top notch there.

But seriously speaking, yep, anything even hinting at planned obsolescence is a red flag. I don't think Casio's bluetooth enabled watches are intentionally in that category, by any means, at least the ones currently available. As mentioned above, you can access all the main features of the watch itself without a mobile device.

The companion software side is just so hit and miss when compared to the elegant and robust functionality of the watches themselves. And well, regarding the whole idea of the state of hardware being in constant flux, I just don't want to have anything to do with the culture of disposable electronics and the "buy a new phone every year or every second year" types of cycles Dr. Wong mentioned. For example Apple, at some point a great choice for professional work, became a consumerist brand at a later point in time, aiming at the masses, with distinctly unethical design choices in its products. Wouldn't want any device that I intend to use for at least a decade or two to depend on being able to pair with such a disposable consumer device.
 

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In the short to medium term I would say not because Bluetooth is an international standard but in the longer term who can say. Anyone who owned a gen 1 iPhone will recall that it was equipped with Bluetooth that wasn't actually Bluetooth but Appletooth.
 

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The smart watches or “connected” watches are convenient but you rely on watch manufacturers to update the app, etc. A good way to cycle watches out more frequently.
Agreed.

It is like waiting for WindowsXP fixes in 2020. The world is moving on and people who are waiting for their old devices to be supported and updated will be out of luck.

If anything, they may be rather criticised for their attachment to their out of date devices and bashed for asking for precious resources that could be used to develop and support new product.
 

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I'd say at the rate tech develops they'd be eventually be rendered obsolete. They don't offer the intangible value of "timelessness" that you'd get from mechanical watch, and quartz to an extent.
That being said, some tech folks do love their vintage stuff so possibly in the long term you could see value restored.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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I'm not too worried about the Bluetooth squares. In the future, support for these watches might be dropped; however, they are primarily standalone watches. After playing with the app when I first received my silver square, I have rarely accessed the app. I infrequently use the app for the GPR Rangeman. I suspect that these watches will hold their value due to their inherent self-sufficiency, thus holding their appeal to collectors.
 

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Bluetooth sync is good when I'm travelling because MB6 reception is very spotty in hotels. I haven't tried a GPS watch. How reliable is GPS sync reception?
 

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Avoiding the Bluetooth connected Casios for now. I leave Bluetooth switched off on my phone to conserve battery life.

I've been perfectly happy with time sync from WWVB.

I do think Casio has been smart in assuming that we don't want notifications coming to these new models, so points for that, I guess?
 

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Bluetooth sync is good when I'm travelling because MB6 reception is very spotty in hotels. I haven't tried a GPS watch. How reliable is GPS sync reception?
I've rarely seen my GPS watch (Seiko Astron) fail reception, even indoors. If conditions are, bad (indoors, overcast sky etc) it takes longer, that's all. When conditions are good time reception is a matter of seconds, even location reception is done in 10-20 seconds.

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Are these watches not quartz regulated on their own? At a certain point the Bluetooth will be obsolete but they'll still be functional watches, yes?
Yes and Bluetooth is so ubiquitous now that it will be around for a good while yet.

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I think it would be an issue if the watch CANNOT be adjusted by itself without bluetooth, but because bluetooth is merely just a feature and that the watch will still function with or without bluetooth, I cannot see it devaluing the watch.

Also, with the metal squares or newer MRGs, bluetooth is only 1 of 3 ways that time can sync, there is still MB6 and in MRG's case, GPS.
 

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Bluetooth sync is good when I'm travelling because MB6 reception is very spotty in hotels. I haven't tried a GPS watch. How reliable is GPS sync reception?
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both my gpw and mrgg sync pretty easily and quickly, most the time i dont even notice (and forget to check).  i'll leave the house and walk 5min to the bus stop and somewhere in that time it syncs.  <br>on a cloudy, drizzling day it took my gpw about 2.5-3min but in general theyre so close to the right time i dont even bother checking if they have syncd or not anymore.<br>
 
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