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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello WUS,

My gf has been victim to watching my fascination and appreciation of watches grow over the past year. She has just lately shown interest in finding a watch to call her own. She is going into nursing so she needs a watch to take pulse and preform a few other daily tasks. In comparison to many on these boards I am fairly new to the world of watches and certainly a stranger to women's watches.

I know that she likes the Omega Aqua Terra with the mother of pearl and the following watches:


http://www.brookstone.com/webassets/product_images/700x700/774822p.jpg
http://clockmaker.com.au/w/k2447_2.jpg
http://content.watchesonnet.com/med...525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/2/3/23110342001001.png
http://www.focalinwatches.com/facep/Omega_3684.jpg
http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTzQdO04i7rdqereKDpDMXonJzrjYwdW5hEkBjp5Xz8B-YaLHidQg
http://www.kay.com/images/products/2703/270346202_MV_ZM.jpg

Posted as links because attachments have been having issues. The first* link was her favorite of the evening.

Thank you for any recommendations or help.
 

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I suggest that we meet up later...
 

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Nursing can get dirty with bodily fluids, so I suggest avoiding leather and sticking to bracelets and rubber straps. The Aqua Terra sure looks nice.

I would be curious to listen to what "I Like em BIG ! !" has to say. I hope his name doesn't refer to a woman's waistline.
 

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I got my wife the Ball Fireman Lady's LE... she's a Pediatrician and it's holding up exceptionally well. It's a bit more sporty than what you've shown... but I highly recommend it.

 

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Rubber or natos that can be just thrown out. Fluids tend to get between and into the links on bracelets, so unless you are going to autoclave them they become impossible to sanitize.

I got my nurse friend a hand wind nurses watch for Christmas. This is a fob watch that pins to her scrubs and hangs down, with the face upside down so she can glance down as read it. The one I picked up is a lovely little Swiss made piece from 1960s England with a little Red Cross on the dial and hangs on a steel fob (yeah I know I just contradicted myself). There are plenty out there, modern and vintage, and some of the moderns are built into rubber fobs. My friend loves the one I got her, wears it to work every day, and has told me not only how many compliments she has gotten on it but that it is far more handy for what she does than a wrist watch ever does. So much so that several of her coworkers (including her nurse husband) have followed suit.
 

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Alright, I'll step up. Just let me know where and when.
 
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Rubber or natos that can be just thrown out. Fluids tend to get between and into the links on bracelets, so unless you are going to autoclave them they become impossible to sanitize.

I got my nurse friend a hand wind nurses watch for Christmas. This is a fob watch that pins to her scrubs and hangs down, with the face upside down so she can glance down as read it. The one I picked up is a lovely little Swiss made piece from 1960s England with a little Red Cross on the dial and hangs on a steel fob (yeah I know I just contradicted myself). There are plenty out there, modern and vintage, and some of the moderns are built into rubber fobs. My friend loves the one I got her, wears it to work every day, and has told me not only how many compliments she has gotten on it but that it is far more handy for what she does than a wrist watch ever does. So much so that several of her coworkers (including her nurse husband) have followed suit.
I would think NATOs would be the easiest for bodily fluids. The straps can be removed without tools, washed or thrown out, and there are not little crevices for patients' liquids to get caught. With rubber straps, even, that stuff can collect between the strap and the lugs. Unless you want to spend your weekends bathing your watch on boiling water and Purell, I'd stay away from rubber as well as bracelets. Leather, of course, is a not go. I don't even wear leather in the summer most of the time because I don't like sweating into it. But, I generally wear a different watch to take out the trash (depending on what I have on), so I'm a weirdo.

I'm not a doctor or nurse and I've only ever taken my own pulse (except for this one time with a girl, but we were playing Paramedic Saves Appreciative Girl) but I'm not sure which would be best for that, quartz or automatic? I would think the distinct tick of a quartz would make it easier, and as she's going to be a nurse, the relatively worry-free operation of a quartz watch might really appeal.

There are plenty of watches out there with mother-of-pearl dials, especially in the women's watch world. If you're on a budget, look at brands like Bulova, Seiko, and Citizen. Bulova has a nice history to it, being an American brand way back when (it's now made by Citizen) and Seiko and Citizen are great values and great innovators at affordable prices. I wonder if there's an MOP dial Citizen Eco-Drive....talk about worry-free. Something like a 10 year battery that's solar powered.

Something like this might work. I don't know if a chronograph would make taking pulses easier or harder, but I would imagine easier since you can start and stop it consistently and it sweeps the whole dial.

Citizen Women's FB1180-56D Eco-Drive Miramar Stainless Steel Sport Watch: Watches: Amazon.com

Best of luck. If you have a price range, I think you'll get fewer joke answers, by the way.
 

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I would think NATOs would be the easiest for bodily fluids. The straps can be removed without tools, washed or thrown out, and there are not little crevices for patients' liquids to get caught. With rubber straps, even, that stuff can collect between the strap and the lugs. Unless you want to spend your weekends bathing your watch on boiling water and Purell, I'd stay away from rubber as well as bracelets. Leather, of course, is a not go. I don't even wear leather in the summer most of the time because I don't like sweating into it. But, I generally wear a different watch to take out the trash (depending on what I have on), so I'm a weirdo.

I'm not a doctor or nurse and I've only ever taken my own pulse (except for this one time with a girl, but we were playing Paramedic Saves Appreciative Girl) but I'm not sure which would be best for that, quartz or automatic? I would think the distinct tick of a quartz would make it easier, and as she's going to be a nurse, the relatively worry-free operation of a quartz watch might really appeal.

There are plenty of watches out there with mother-of-pearl dials, especially in the women's watch world. If you're on a budget, look at brands like Bulova, Seiko, and Citizen. Bulova has a nice history to it, being an American brand way back when (it's now made by Citizen) and Seiko and Citizen are great values and great innovators at affordable prices. I wonder if there's an MOP dial Citizen Eco-Drive....talk about worry-free. Something like a 10 year battery that's solar powered.

Something like this might work. I don't know if a chronograph would make taking pulses easier or harder, but I would imagine easier since you can start and stop it consistently and it sweeps the whole dial.

Citizen Women's FB1180-56D Eco-Drive Miramar Stainless Steel Sport Watch: Watches: Amazon.com

Best of luck. If you have a price range, I think you'll get fewer joke answers, by the way.
Boiling is exactly right on the rubber. Natos are ok, but you have to be equally diligent about them. They also take more time to dry once they get soaked, which can be uncomfortable especially when you are talking about the hand washing/sterilization requirements -- up forearms (for an asceptic wash), many times a day (beginning and end of day, before and after patient contact, before and after putting on gloves, before invasive procedures, etc.), with hot water and not the mildest of soap soaking into the strap, plus constant moisturizing (washing your hands that much drys them out and cracks the skin -- good way to pick up an infection yourself). Speaking of the washing requirement, make sure the watch (if going with a wristwatch, this is another vote for a fob or brooch style watch if you ask me) is well sealed and will hold up to the constant dousing in hot water and astringent soaps, I would avoid things like the bezel in Raza's suggestion (though an eco drive movement is a fine idea) and the rotating bezel of the wenger you posted, lots of nooks and crannys on both, and the stones on Raza's probably aren't going to be there that long.

Quartz or auto doesn't much matter, but I'd keep it inexpensive and save the real watch for outside of work. No chrono -- you don't want to be touching the watch -- and hands are busy anyway (holding a stethoscope to a brachial pulse, while manipulating the blood pressure cuff with the other hand for example).
 

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how about the omega ladies speedmaster reduced. this comes in a mop dial, a myriad of different colors & combinations. can be worn on a bracelet & strap. good luck on your search.

Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Fashion accessory Product
cheers,
larry
 

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Is the OP's GF a combat nurse? With some of the responses you'd think so...

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Is the OP's GF a combat nurse? With some of the responses you'd think so...

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Sneezing, vomiting, bleeding, seeping; all these things happen in your average hospital, Max.
 

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I was thinking a vintage Dr's watch (they run small) or a vintage Nurses watch , but maybe not for every day ........ lol . It would be a good second watch for her !😜


Mike B , Canada ⌚
 

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Help me satisfy my woman!
That got my attention!

Had to check to make sure I was on WUS as I thought I had mistakenly accessed one of my "secret folder" sites..............
 

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My wife works at the hospital. She wears Victorinox Renegade for work, and loves it.

Watch Analog watch Watch accessory Black Fashion accessory

Buy something nice for your GF for off duty use, add $120 or so and get the Victorinox for work.

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Hamilton Khaki Field in either quartz or automatic - and not just because I'm wearing mine right now. Hear me out:

- No bezel, pushers, or any other unnecessary flim flam for stuff to get trapped in
- 100M resistance should be able to stand up to any dousing in a hospital
- Sapphire crystal
- Not too expensive, so when it gets scrubbed too much, well, it won't be wallet breaking to let it go
- Long lugs with standard 20mm spacing are a definite plus. My thinking here is that NATOs would be easiest to deal with in that environment, and long lugs make it easy to switch out NATOs quickly. And at $4 a pop on ebay (I just got four for $14), she can afford to keep a stash of them in her locker to switch out wet/dirty NATOs for new ones (or just a new style)

A Bathys 100 Fathoms would be in a similar vein, but with a screwdown crown.

Neither of these options are women-specific, but if the watch is being worn more for function than appearance, a clean, legible dial is likely a good option.
 

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Well my two cents.....I'd get her that pendant watch discussed above...something nice that would attract attention from the other nurses and yet be up out of the way. You can get a nice mechanical one and have it serviced; it'll last a long time. Then get her the Aqua, Ball, Omega or something like that for good. At that point you will have satisfied her urge for a watch and be in position to take care of the rest as a byproduct of your efforts.....
I might also add that you should take her to a high end watch store and see if she bonds with the mid size pieces; many women are taking to these larger than traditional women's watches. If so, that opens up a whole new avenue of new and vintage watches for you. Get use to the fact that you'll likely be getting her some with regularity if she gets hooked: like the rest of us...
 

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I spend a lot of time in hospitals, about once every two or three weeks and have noticed the following:

1. Only the male nurses wear expensive watches and even then most of them don't
2. Most of the nurses wear a watch with 24 hour time
3. Most of the watches have an easily read dial that tends to be more large than small
4. Not at m any use a digital
5. They all have different style straps and bracelets.

The comments regarding bodily fluids and getting banged up on a regular basis need to be seriously considered when choosing a watch for a nurse.

if it were me, I'd go for a Seiko 5 with a 24 hour dial. Good luck!
 

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That title thread is dangerous my friend :)
 

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Nursing can get dirty with bodily fluids, so I suggest avoiding leather and sticking to bracelets and rubber straps. The Aqua Terra sure looks nice.

I would be curious to listen to what "I Like em BIG ! !" has to say. I hope his name doesn't refer to a woman's waistline.
Sneezing, vomiting, bleeding, seeping; all these things happen in your average hospital, Max.

Ehhhhhwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww (with my jaw moving back and forth horizontally in my best Jim Varney impression:

Ernest P. Worrell - Ehhhhwwwww (Ernest Goes to Camp) - YouTube

One of his best (but I digress...)

Ernest goes to Jail - YouTube


I would be curious to listen to what "I Like em BIG ! !" has to say. I hope his name doesn't refer to a woman's waistline.
Well since it is a watch forum... but it also refers to a woman's hand size (hands cupped, held out in front of you, palms facing you)

Sorry, I keep digressing. Dang you guys!
 
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