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Hello!
I will buy suunto core black yellow tommorow, but I have one question.
How much m/ft yellow black can go under water, because on first page of suunto web, they say 10m/30ft, and on technical data page they say 30m/100ft. :-s
 

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Hello!
I will buy suunto core black yellow tommorow, but I have one question.
How much m/ft yellow black can go under water, because on first page of suunto web, they say 10m/30ft, and on technical data page they say 30m/100ft. :-s
Not sure what is the right answer, but wouldn't want to take it underwater for any length of time.
 

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And why is that?
(sorry for my grammar, I'm from croatia):-x
LOL your grammar is better than many people who were born speaking English.:)

The Suunto Core is water resistant, but I wouldn't want to take any risk in getting water inside the watch, etc. I have heard similar bad stories with the Vector, that although it is water resistant to 30M, it has died when people swim in the ocean, or a pool, etc. I think the Core is fine in the rain, or in the snow, but I don't see it as being a suitable watch for water sports (like a dive watch, etc.). I know they have a depth meter on the watch, but still, it just doesn't seem durable enough for this kind of activity (and the fact that my yellow and black Core is my second due to manufacturing defects, I don't want to take a chance swimming with it). I could be wrong, but I will let others take the gamble and post back on the forum with how the watch performs after repeated use underwater.
 

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The fact that it is equipped with a depth meter suggests to me Suunto have enough confidence in the watch for it to be submerged in water.
 

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This thing with Suuntos and water resistance bugs me!:rodekaarto|

I was in contact with Suunto by e-mail and I only got this official response:

"Response (Mihoko Fukuta) - 11/09/2007 01:06 AM
Dear Sir/Madam,
Thank you for contacting Suunto.

Our products are tested with the ISO (International Organization for standardization) standard
2281. This means that the product is water-resistant. In addition to the term "water resistant",watches may be marked with an indication of a test overpressure given as a pressure in bars
(3bar / 10bar) or as a depth in meters (30/100 meters). These indications do not correspond
to a diving depth but refer to the pressure at which the water overpressure test was conducted.
WARNING: Outdoor wristop computers are not meant for SCUBA diving.

We will forward your message to our R&D department for future development/improvement of our products. We thank you for your feedback as it is thanks to our customers' or future customers' comments that we are able to develop better products.

With Best Regards,
Suunto Helpdesk"

This response is just the official statement that can aalso be found in their FAQ at their site. READ MORE ABOUT THIS HERE : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_2281

I think it does not tell the truth. Since the Core has a depth Gauge and many people using 30 Meter Suuntos has reported succesfull dives with them I think that Suunto 30 meter rating infact is very conservative and that they should be rated higher, perhaps upwards of 100 meters like the Casio Pro Trek's /Path Finders. I think we must have it tested. This is a call for the behalf of the entire Suunto community and perhaps others who might want to join the Suunto community.

Someone who ownes the Suunto Core watch please lets have it pressure tested at your local professional watch retailer. I dont know how it is in your country but here in Sweden it is very easy to get it done since almost every watch retailer has a pressure test device, it only costs about $8 here in Sweden to get it tested. Ask them to pressure test it to 10 bars/ATM or 100 meter and see if it can handle it.

This would be a great service to the Suunto fans that finally would know of Suunto is just using very conservative ratings and that it could take much more then what is officially stated.

Because as it is now it is just up to speculation and I know there are a ton of people especially Casio fans that dont even consider Suuntos due to their low rating for WR. If this mystery is solved it could mean alot of new customers to the Suunto brand.
 

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Keep in mind that Suunto were making their reputation with Dive Computers before they ever started on ABC wristops, so I think you can trust that they know a thing or two about making things work underwater.
One of the first things I did with my Core was try out the depth gauge and it works great.
 

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Keep in mind that Suunto were making their reputation with Dive Computers before they ever started on ABC wristops, so I think you can trust that they know a thing or two about making things work underwater.
One of the first things I did with my Core was try out the depth gauge and it works great.
Understood, but I think I will hold off until people here post regular exposure of the Core to water.
 

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I have a Vector that has been through everything I can think to do with it. Remember these are FIELD watches and not designed as dive watches. I have had mine down about 20 feet and that was plenty for me. It was cold, my eyes hurt, and it got dark... Thats deep enough for this land lover!

I have a buddy who is in Special Forces... he has taken his Advisor EVERYWHERE... its been down to about 50-60 feet with no issues.

I wouldn't take one diving, but they are pretty reliable. I have never had an issue. I think its funny that most of us fuss over water resistance when the deepest most of us take a field watch is a few feet under the surface.

I would not hesitate for one second to swim or play in the water with any of my Suunto products. Again, the ABC watches are NOT divers... They perform very well at what they are designed to do.

Personally, I think that Suunto is a little conservative with their water resistance ratings... But I dont have any proof of that. My guess is that they can probably go deeper than stated. But I know MY body wont be that deep!
 

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I have a Vector that has been through everything I can think to do with it. Remember these are FIELD watches and not designed as dive watches. I have had mine down about 20 feet and that was plenty for me. It was cold, my eyes hurt, and it got dark... Thats deep enough for this land lover!

I have a buddy who is in Special Forces... he has taken his Advisor EVERYWHERE... its been down to about 50-60 feet with no issues.

I wouldn't take one diving, but they are pretty reliable. I have never had an issue. I think its funny that most of us fuss over water resistance when the deepest most of us take a field watch is a few feet under the surface.

I would not hesitate for one second to swim or play in the water with any of my Suunto products. Again, the ABC watches are NOT divers... They perform very well at what they are designed to do.

Personally, I think that Suunto is a little conservative with their water resistance ratings... But I dont have any proof of that. My guess is that they can probably go deeper than stated. But I know MY body wont be that deep!
Yes this is true but one must consider the PR and prestige effect!

The conservative 30 M rating will hurt the brand and I know it has caused many potential customers to run away from the brand and go with a Casio or Nike instead. It has to do with confidence in the product. If I go swimming or snorkling with a Casio I am not the slightest worried that it will break on me, even though thats a definite possibility the brand has built up its confidence level to the point where I do not worry about it. In the rest of the watch world a 30 meter rating is merely a dust protector that protects against dust entering the case or agains water splashes and at most short durations under a few feet of still and calm water.

So it is strange that Suunto has choosen to be in that league when empirical evidence from the field seems to suggest otherwise. Thats why it would be so interesting to see if it would indeed pass a 10 bar(100 M) pressure test at a watch jeweller. If it does then it means that the Core is indeed fully comparable to a Casio Path Finder/ Pro Trek. That would definetly help many people descide between a Casio, Nike and a Suunto.

Perhaps you could be the brave one and do such a test and see if you Core will pass the pressure test?:-!
 

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Sure, send me some money and Ill do it. But I feel comfortable enough with the watch that I'm not going to "waste" the time or money for the test. Better yet, buy me a testing machine! :) I bet it goes both ways. I bet there are a lot of "200M" watches out there that are not really. (If you tested them all). I think Suunto has chosen to err on the side of conservative WR ratings. Again, 100FT is way more than most of us choose to go. And if I were diving, I wouldn't wear one of my field watches... Thats why I have all these 200M dive watches laying around.

I'm not saying I understand their marketing... or even that I have any facts to back up my claim that they are erring on the conservative side. But I have had 200M G Shocks fail in the bathtub. :) What Im saying is that I think the 30-100M WR that Suunto offers is enough for the job that the watch is designed to do.

As for sales, I haven't seen their numbers but they dont seem to be in any trouble. They may not feel a need to compete with the Casio Protrek/Pathfinder line. Thats their business decision. Personally I think they should be pushing toward a higher WR and solar capabilities... but no one asked me for my marketing advice! :)

Lastly, I don't think its an issue of "bravery" to have any watch tested. They don't pressurize the water per se, instead I believe its a "reverse" pressurization... so its not that water would be seeping into the watch in a test, its whether air bubbles escape from the watch. (At least I think).

If the 30M WR of a Vector isn't enough for your lifestyle, perhaps you should get an Observer, or maybe you would be happier with a Casio product.
 

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I think it's a bit of a wasted opportunity. After all, if you are going to provide a depth gauge, 10m isn't really that useful. It should measure down to at least 30m or it's not worth having one at all. Ideally 80m like my Citizen ;-) But I guess it depends on intended usage. Surfers hopefully won't be hanging around at 10m!!! For freedivers, you want at least 30 to 40m minimum, and preferably something small and low profile. I think it's still a little strange. But cool!
 

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For me, the depth gauge is totally useless. I will likely never use that function.
 

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Even for occasional divers like me, who stick to the Med and the Red Sea, where all the best diving is in ten metres anyway, this function is, at best, gimmicky.

As long as the watch can stand up to the rigours of swimming and occasional snorkelling (and therefore also most above-water watersports like windsurfing and jetskiing), I suspect 99% of customers will be quite happy.
 

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Sure, send me some money and Ill do it. But I feel comfortable enough with the watch that I'm not going to "waste" the time or money for the test. Better yet, buy me a testing machine! :) I bet it goes both ways. I bet there are a lot of "200M" watches out there that are not really. (If you tested them all). I think Suunto has chosen to err on the side of conservative WR ratings. Again, 100FT is way more than most of us choose to go. And if I were diving, I wouldn't wear one of my field watches... Thats why I have all these 200M dive watches laying around.

I'm not saying I understand their marketing... or even that I have any facts to back up my claim that they are erring on the conservative side. But I have had 200M G Shocks fail in the bathtub. :) What Im saying is that I think the 30-100M WR that Suunto offers is enough for the job that the watch is designed to do.

As for sales, I haven't seen their numbers but they dont seem to be in any trouble. They may not feel a need to compete with the Casio Protrek/Pathfinder line. Thats their business decision. Personally I think they should be pushing toward a higher WR and solar capabilities... but no one asked me for my marketing advice! :)

Lastly, I don't think its an issue of "bravery" to have any watch tested. They don't pressurize the water per se, instead I believe its a "reverse" pressurization... so its not that water would be seeping into the watch in a test, its whether air bubbles escape from the watch. (At least I think).

If the 30M WR of a Vector isn't enough for your lifestyle, perhaps you should get an Observer, or maybe you would be happier with a Casio product.
The problem with a 30 m rating is that as I said above in the rest of the watch world a 30 m rating means that the watch is not even suitable to be wearing while surface swimming. Therefore people considering a Suunto Core might think thats the case for Suunto's aswell and terefore dismsiss it as their choice. Im quite sure that many more people would choose a Suunto Core or Vector instead of a Casio PathFinder due to its superior professional sensors if they knew that it could take the beat when used for swimming and snorkling but because it is only rated 30 M they consider it weak and wont buy it because they want something more sturdy that can take som action in the water. I am one of those convinced that Suunto Core or Vector can be used in the water and therefor shoudl not have a 30 M rating. Perhaps they are indeed comparable to a 100M Pathfinder when it comes to water resistance. I am just puzzled by the fact that Suunto has choosen to be so conservative that many people think its fragile crap. They are definetly loosing customers on this!

Regarding the brave remark, I know they are not using water, I have seen my watches be pressure tested so I know how it is done. I used the word brave because if it would turn out it failed the 10 bar test it might affect your confidence for your Core!:rodekaart:-d

I think it's a bit of a wasted opportunity. After all, if you are going to provide a depth gauge, 10m isn't really that useful. It should measure down to at least 30m or it's not worth having one at all. Ideally 80m like my Citizen ;-) But I guess it depends on intended usage. Surfers hopefully won't be hanging around at 10m!!! For freedivers, you want at least 30 to 40m minimum, and preferably something small and low profile. I think it's still a little strange. But cool!
I think that a 10 m depth gauge is usefull for people just swimming and taking short snorkling dives or diving at low depth. I dont think people snorkling often goes more then 10 meters.

Yes its toyish but atleast thats a feature not found in Casio Pathfinders.

Even for occasional divers like me, who stick to the Med and the Red Sea, where all the best diving is in ten metres anyway, this function is, at best, gimmicky.

As long as the watch can stand up to the rigours of swimming and occasional snorkelling (and therefore also most above-water watersports like windsurfing and jetskiing), I suspect 99% of customers will be quite happy.
Agree! But the problem is that many people that knows the limitation of normal 30 m rated watches, would not even consider sinking it in water so I think thats a problem for Suunto. I simply cannot understand Suuntos thinking about this. I think its quite obvious that Suunto 30 m is not the same as 30 m in the rest of the watch world and thats a problem!
 
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