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This is from a thread on TRF. Someone bought a new TT DJ from an AD, went into a hot tub for about 30 mins and the yellow gold has been tarnished and is now looks like red gold. The general consensus there is that this from high levels of chlorine or another type of cleaning chemical. I've attached the picture since you need to be signed in to see it from the link below.

https://www.rolexforums.com/showthread.php?t=673371

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From a RSC employee who posts on that forum he thinks all that may be needed is a soak in some jewelry cleaning liquid. Hopefully that's the case and this is an easy fix for that guy. Check chemical levels before taking your PM watches in the water.

Has anyone here had this happen to your watch?
 

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Thank you for the post. The OP didn't have enough posts to put up the image when he first posted. All I can say is wow, he has found a way to convert a TT YG/SS to a TT RG/SS in a few short minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for the post. The OP didn't have enough posts to put up the image when he first posted. All I can say is wow, he has found a way to convert a TT YG/SS to a TT RG/SS in a few short minutes.
You're welcome. I didn't realize this was posted here as well but at least the photo is up. The color difference is crazy when you compare to the still YG hour markers. I look forward to seeing the outcome.
 

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wow. weird!!. never seen such thing happened to a yellow gold before.
i'm wondering if the tarnish would rub off after wearing the watch for a while. or maybe remove the oxide layer with a Cape-Cod polishing cloth (masking the steel links with a scotch tape before the process of course).
 

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or maybe remove the oxide layer with a Cape-Cod polishing cloth (masking the steel links with a scotch tape before the process of course).
Absolutely not! You wouldn’t be able to get into every part using CC and would end up with a mess! It needs dipping.
 

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I thought gold was relatively inert, so you learn something new everyday.

I wonder if the bracelet can be cleaned in one of those ultrasonic jewelry cleaners...
 

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I thought gold was relatively inert, so you learn something new everyday.

I wonder if the bracelet can be cleaned in one of those ultrasonic jewelry cleaners...
it is relatively inert, but it does slowly react to chlorine.

That being said i think most manufacturers, Rolex included(I may be wrong) warn to not wear watches in hot tubs etc. Not sure why anyone would but who knows the circumstances, i do think the color looks pretty cool. rather unique.
 

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Absolutely not! You wouldn’t be able to get into every part using CC and would end up with a mess! It needs dipping.

OK. point well taken. but only in the hands of a inexperienced person.
i don't expect you to know me. i do design and make my own jewelry (as a hobby). been doing it for 30 years. i only mentioned Cape-Cod because i don't expect people to have the right tools&materials to work on metal.
if this were my watch. i'd use Pumice powder to remove the oxide layer, followed by polishing compound with a bristle brush (i can easily get into those Nooks&Crevices) , then use Rouge to bring it to high shine.. sure if you're unfamiliar with this process. don't do it. guarantee will end up with a mess.
 

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OK. point well taken. but only in the hands of a inexperienced person.
i don't expect you to know me. i do design and make my own jewelry (as a hobby). been doing it for 30 years. i only mentioned Cape-Cod because i don't expect people to have the right tools&materials to work on metal.
if this were my watch. i'd use Pumice powder to remove the oxide layer, followed by polishing compound with a bristle brush (i can easily get into those Nooks&Crevices) , then use Rouge to bring it to high shine.. sure if you're unfamiliar with this process. don't do it. guarantee will end up with a mess.
Funnily enough I also have considerable experience polishing precious and non-precious metals from my old job as a dental technician. Pumice is a harsh abrasive and I would suggest is going to dull any polished surface, and risk rounding off any sharp edges. Polishing compound with bristle is risking the same or at least leaving brush tracks! However a chemical dip to remove the oxide followed by a gentle brightening with rouge on a wool mop would be adequate.
 

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The gold is inert, but the other metals are not. Do reference the original thread, as he has posted additional pictures after cleaning and before he sent it to the RSC, and it does look a bit less brownish/orange. Remember 25% of 18k is not gold.
 

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:) . i feel like i'm on a Jewelry blog.
since you know about metals and polishing. i'm sure you know about different type of Pumice.. there's one called : Fine Pumicewhich looks and feel like Bakery Flour. it's perfect for removing oxide layer and scratches.
and as i said in my precious reply. you start off with Pumice then compound and rouge.

all i can say is: this stuff works for me. if Dipping works better for you ?. then dipping it is.

cheers.
 

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I would not attempt to mess with that color change. Take to AD and see if they recommend RSC. Many DIY efforts result in expensive disasters.
 
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I would not attempt to mess with that color change. Take to AD and see if they recommend RSC. Many DIY efforts result in expensive disasters.
Exactly! For a situation such as this it is best not to listen to all the "do this" inputs ad take the problem directly to Rolex.

Do this the right way from the get-go and avoid potentially even more issues.
 
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