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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Do you "print" or do you use "cursive" writing. And a related question is - how many pen lovers on this board know cursive writing?

It was fairly recently that I learned that cursive witting isn't even taught in US schools anymore! I guess I'm showing my age. To me "writing" and "cursive writing" mean the same thing.

But back to the original question - does it even make sense to use a nice fountain pen to "print" a note? I enjoy imagining the ink in the pen evenly flow out as I "write" (that is cursive). To print, I'd rather us a ball point.

What is the thinking on this question?
 

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Cursive is florid, with all the loops, and it's hard to write either quickly or well. It's dying for good reason. And actually, the loops work better with a pencil or ballpoint.

My basic style is cursive italic, but my writing's terrible. :)
 

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It matters not, writing or printing, but the pleasure you get using the pen.....
 
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Cursive for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Interesting range of replies.

Myself, I've found that my cursive writing with a fountain pen is not so great. Seems I've been typing on a keyboard too long. I'm working to improve it.

I've been practicing though I'm not sure who will be the recipient of my well formed missive.

Who writes letters these days? To whom?

In the meantime - my short term goal is to be able to read my own writing :)
 

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Cursive is a better nib test. You'll detect skipping or other issues right away. That is another thing.
 

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Cursive is florid, with all the loops, and it's hard to write either quickly or well. It's dying for good reason. And actually, the loops work better with a pencil or ballpoint.

My basic style is cursive italic, but my writing's terrible. :)
Interesting that you say it's hard to write quickly. One of its functions is to be quicker, because you're not constantly lifting and moving the pen. You move in one continuous line, with the occasional interruption to cross a t or dot an i.
 

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I learned cursive in school (I'm 50) and I still use it for personal writing. At work I take lots of notes, so printing it is. My fountain pens make the printing easier on my knuckles after a long session.
 

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Always been cursive for me. T’was drummed into our heads and rapped onto our knuckles.... so much so that it’s about the only way I can write..... when I do write that is.
That said, there’s something about cursive writing with a nice fountain pen and the tactile sensation of wet steel (or gold) on good quality paper. Very satisfying.
I’m now trying to get the kids into using ink pens. Got them a pair of Jinhao sharks as bait.
 

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Neither - I write lots of figure eights and upward and downward strokes on 100g weaved Conqueror paper -
this tests flow & removes any very slight burrs from the tip. And then, if all is smooth - CURSIVE ;)
 

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To test drive I actually write numbers, 1-10. It just seems to bring out any issues.

I dont write much these days, with the advent of computers and email etc.

Back in the 80s and 90s I wrote a lot, mainly ledgers, letters and faxes. When writing documents and reports to be faxed I would print them. Faxes back then were not that good, and the readers were in France. If they didnt understand something I would get a 3am phone call. It was better to print.

Letters, usually air mail letters to my mother, were cursive. It took longer, sometimes looked dreadful, and often led to confusion when my mother missread my writing.

These days my mother is no longer here, everything seems to be on a computer, and my iPad has a stylus and I can write on its screen.

The only thing I seem to use a pen for these days is for signing documents.
 

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At the ripe age of 71, I have decided to try my hand at cursive again, although I have printed exclusively (other than my signature) for decades. I embarrass myself whenever I try to scrawl my third-grade-looking cursive.

So, I have purchased an inexpensive fountain pen, a Pilot Metropolitan with fine point, and ordered a used copy of Tom Gourdie's "Handwriting For Today." The book has not arrived yet, but I have printed a half dozen full pages with the Pilot and am amazed at how much more discerning I am about letter size, spacing, and all of that. Wow, practice really does help!

I do find that there is a slight scratchiness with the nib as opposed to the ultra smooth ink delivery of the .8mm (Extra Fine) fiber tip Rotring I've been using forever. Maybe I'm doing something wrong, but I have tried many different angles and rotations of the barrel with no improvement. Still, there's something about learning its quirks that is fascinating.

Maybe the nib is too fine for my use. Shucks, I might have to give in to the acquisition disease and try another style and size.
 
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