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I've been curious about this... the longevity of G-Shock modules. It always amazes me how many CASIO watches survive across the decades. More than any other digital watch, you can find them all the way back from the 1980's, still able to keep time today. But... often what happens is someone forgets about the watch and it sits for many years with a dead battery, resting... so that one day it can be revived. I've brought back to life quite a few. I often wonder if longevity has anything to do with use... meaning, if you have two DW-5600C's from the 1980's where one has been running since purchased and another was left with a dead battery for a couple of decades, will they both have about the same amount of life left, or will the "Rumpelstiltskin" one have less wear and last longer?

Do you have any older G-Shocks in your collection that have been running steady since the day you got it, discounting the down time for battery changes? If so, for how many years has it been running?
 

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My DW-9400 has been running continuously since being purchased in December 1998. In seventeen years it has had two battery changes, both done by me. It doesn't get worn too often anymore, but for the first dozen years of ownership it got daily use.
 

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My DW-9400 has been running continuously since being purchased in December 1998. In seventeen years it has had two battery changes, both done by me. It doesn't get worn too often anymore, but for the first dozen years of ownership it got daily use.
Welcome to the forum Lee K!
 

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My DW6900 served me well since 1996, went with me through 8 years of hard beating in the Army. Last 12 years it has been and also will be my daily beater at my job working for the Justice Department. Second battery now, always flawless. Very reliable. 👍👍👍 ☺
 

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I often wonder if longevity has anything to do with use... meaning, if you have two DW-5600C's from the 1980's where one has been running since purchased and another was left with a dead battery for a couple of decades, will they both have about the same amount of life left, or will the "Rumpelstiltskin" one have less wear and last longer?
My guess would be that the decay of the electronics has more to do with temperature and chemical exposure than whether the module is running or not. E.g. if the gasket gets damaged (e.g. in a battery change), the humidity that the module is exposed to probably makes a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My guess would be that the decay of the electronics has more to do with temperature and chemical exposure than whether the module is running or not. E.g. if the gasket gets damaged (e.g. in a battery change), the humidity that the module is exposed to probably makes a difference.
That's my hope as well. Since the casing of a G-Shock is so well sealed, keeping out the elements and moisture, I can't see why the electronics would fail except for exposure to extreme heat or a leaky battery cell.

I hope I can live up past 100 years and still be in good physical shape (no noteworthy chronic pain so I'm enjoying life!); it would be pretty remarkable to be at that point in time, looking over my collection of vintage CASIO watches and seeing them still running (provided those battery cells are still made!). So I'm going to try a long term experiment. A few vintage CASIO watches in my collection are duplicates. I've had batteries in them all. I'm going to take them out of a couple and let them be. Then one day... if I'm still around and WUS is still here, I'll follow-up. ;-)
 

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It's not a G-Shock, but my Casio DW-260 has been running continuously since 1986, alternating between a "daily wearer" for a few years, then as a "weekends only watch" for several years, and then mostly relegated to sitting in a drawer.

I only remember changing the battery once, in 2002 or so, but it's probably time again since the backlight looks like it's starting to get dim. (Who am I kidding? Those old backlights ARE dim, especially compared to newer EL panels or today's watches' LEDs!)
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
It's not a G-Shock, but my Casio DW-260 has been running continuously since 1986, alternating between a "daily wearer" for a few years, then as a "weekends only watch" for several years, and then mostly relegated to sitting in a drawer.

I only remember changing the battery once, in 2002 or so, but it's probably time again since the backlight looks like it's starting to get dim. (Who am I kidding? Those old backlights ARE dim, especially compared to newer EL panels or today's watches' LEDs!)
That CASIO DW-2xx series is really quite nice and very much underrated, probably because of the small size. The case backs are beautifully done, made of nicely finished stainless steel. Cosmetically, there is no protection afforded to the face so these get scratched up pretty badly. Anyway, they're slim and wear quite comfortably. It's too bad on some models the CDT and STW are limited to 60 mins... but still usable; others are longer, some up to 24 hours. Does the DW-260 show time in both CDT and STW mode?
 

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Cosmetically, there is no protection afforded to the face so these get scratched up pretty badly. Anyway, they're slim and wear quite comfortably. It's too bad the CDT and STW are limited to 60 mins... but still usable. Does the DW-260 show time in both CDT and STW mode?
You're right -- the crystal IS a bit dinged up but still readable!

The CDT on this one goes all the way to 23 hours 59 minutes, and it looks like the stopwatch does too:

dw 260 1.jpg

This one only shows current time in CDT mode -- when I replace the battery I may need to find another stock strap for this one! :)
 

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I worked for the Justice Department from 1975 to 1981 :) I didn't own a G-Shock then, but I had various inexpensive Casios, long departed. Heck, I'm lucky I'm still hanging on...


My DW6900 served me well since 1996, went with me through 8 years of hard beating in the Army. Last 12 years it has been and also will be my daily beater at my job working for the Justice Department. Second battery now, always flawless. Very reliable.  ☺
 

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My DW-5200 has been running since I bought it in 1985. So, 31 years and counting. On his third battery. Cheers
Luis. View attachment 6743730
Nice to see the white hasn't rubbed off. I recently got a DW5610 and I like them to look good, it looks like this one. My only concern with it lasting is the solar battery over the years. Casio says it will last the life of the watch. 30+ years? All my G's are new so... Time will tell. :)
 

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I recently got a DW5610 and I like them to look good, it looks like this one. My only concern with it lasting is the solar battery over the years. Casio says it will last the life of the watch. 30+ years? All my G's are new so... Time will tell. :)
From other threads, it looks like you recently got a GW-5610 -- most DW- models are "just" battery powered, G- models are solar-powered, and GW- is the prefix for solar/atomic models. :)

Nobody here is expecting our watches' useful lifespans to end when the battery eventually fails, since the batteries are easily replaced, but currently 20 to 30 years is a pretty good guess on the lifespan of these rechargeable batteries. (I recently ordered a new battery for a PAW-1100 that needs work done, but now it won't need to be opened again for many years -- and the battery itself was less than six dollars!)
 

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I recently got a DW5610 and I like them to look good, it looks like this one. My only concern with it lasting is the solar battery over the years. Casio says it will last the life of the watch. 30+ years? All my G's are new so... Time will tell. :)
From other threads, it looks like you recently got a GW-5610 -- most DW- models are "just" battery powered, G- models are solar-powered, and GW- is the prefix for solar/atomic models.


Nobody here is expecting our watches' useful lifespans to end when the battery eventually fails, since the batteries are easily replaced, but currently 20 to 30 years is a pretty good guess on the lifespan of these rechargeable batteries. (I recently ordered a new battery for a PAW-1100 that needs work done, but now it won't need to be opened again for many years -- and the battery itself was less than six dollars!)

Your right it is a GW. Still getting use to the model numbers. Not my first Casio's but my first 2 G Shocks, the other is a GA100.

Cant complain at 20/30 years even if the battery is obsolete by then. :)
 
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